The Pre-Job Brief Toolbox

Moving the Pre-Job Brief from a from a post event legal tool to an Organizational process control to help electric utilites “Get Ahead” of a potential catastrophic event.

Currently v1.0

Overview

Before Using the Pre-Job Brief Toolbox:
Job and task briefings are critical to conducting our work in a safe manner.
After...
Job and task briefings are critical to protecting us from on-the-job hazards. The briefings also enable the organization to remove previously hidden, latent organizational hazards.

The Backstory

One day at a WECC human performance meeting several utilites a contractor and a vendor were comparing the pre-job briefs used by their individual organizations. As they were comparing the 5-7 pre-job briefs they realized that no single pre-job brief was "complete" but across all of these pre-job briefs there was a "more complete" pre-job brief. That team and a few advisors decided to see if they could not collect many more pre-job briefs from across the electric utilities industry and try to come up with some sort of "tool box" that would be useful to anyone who is updating or writing a new pre-job brief.

If You Were Going to Update or Write a New PJB

  • Get a Blank Sheet of Paper
  • Set Your Goal High: To Prevent the Next Event...(not solely a post event legal document)
  • Review the Minimum OSHA Requirements
  • Ask Dozens of Your Colleagues for their PJB's
  • Examine those dozens of PJBs for Consistencies and the Inconsistencies
  • Look for a Pattern of Good Practices
  • Learn How Your Colleagues Have Been Applying Human Performance
Well guess what?
You don't have to do all that work. The pre-job brief team did it for you.

We reached out to our colleagues across the U.S. electric power industry to pin (share) their pre-job briefs to an online cork board that we setup:

Pin Your PJB   www.knowledgekeeper.com/pjbs

Dozens of Utilites, contractors and vendors have been pinning (sharing) their pre-job briefs and new ones are pinned all the time. The pre-job brief team has been examining every one of those pre-job briefs and extracting what we call tools: OSHA tools, Good Practice tools and Human Peformance tools. Essentially we are just collecting pre-job briefs and doing a simple, but very tedious benchmarking exercise.

Why did we start out the project this way?
Originally the team was at a meeting comparing pre-job briefs and we realized that across the industry no utility, contractor or vendor had the perfect pre-job brief. However, taken together as a whole all of the pre-job briefs from across the industry contain almost every hazard mitigation strategy learned from previous events. To put it more simply "No one of us is as smart as all of us..."

Prerequisite: Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)

Job hazard analysis (JHA) is a predetermined list of hazards that could be encountered within a specific job. For example a battery work JHA would lay out expected hazards such as acid spills, burns, lead contamination, DC electrical shock hazards. The JHA is a management control that allows a particular job to be researched by an organizations occupational health group as well as it’s technical services to ensure that no hidden hazards or latent organizational hazards exist.

In addition the JHA should contain any technical or safety procedures associated with the work. This is an area any organization could really benefit. Many organizations have safety procedures in several documents, and often some of the procedures or standards get overlooked. JHA’s can be used for job planning, as well as building the pre-job brief. This will eliminate lengthy check box PJB forms with too many check boxes that do not apply to the task. JHA’s are a critical piece of an organization's safety culture.

Prerequisite: Understanding Pre-Task versus Pre-Job Briefs (briefings):

It is important that the two are considered separately. The pre-job brief is a larger scale (relative to the task) where the crew are led by a foreman or other in charge of the job. Details of the entire job or day are discussed. This may include multiple critical steps such as grounding, rigging, conductor work, etc.

A pre-task brief is a personal tool where the worker or a group of workers, just before the individual executes a critical step the individual should take a moment to ensure they are ready and in the right place about to take the right action. Then afterward they should review that action to ensure it went properly. Typically there is no form filled out. This is often guided by SAFER (summarize critical steps, anticipate likely errors, forsee consequences, evaluate defenses, review action) or two minute rule (taking a moment to ensure you review the worksite before a critical step).

Usage

Class: OSHA

OSHA has pre-job brief requirements that all employers must follow before a work task is executed. In the Pre-Job Brief Toolbox we consider the following OSHA class tools:

Hazards
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Control of Energized Sources
Work Procedures

Class: Good Practices

Many electric utilities, contractors and vendors in addtion to the OSHA class tools also tend to add in some good practices. For example, a table showing the minimum approach distance for various high voltages is not required to be in the pre-job brief. However, many pre-job briefs include a simple table of minimum approach distances. In the Pre-Job Brief Toolbox we consider the following Good Practices class tools:

Emergency Preparedness
Minimum Approach Distance (MWD)
Designated Observer or Spotter

Class: Human Performance

It is a normal part of an organizations’s business model to inadvertently create hazards which reduce human performance. Workforce capability and human performance can be divided into management, team and individual levels - more than half of all event reports indicate some management or organizational challenges. Building human performance into the pre-job brief enables organzations to identify latent organzational hazards and work toward reducing catastrophic events toward zero. The pre-job brief toolbox considers the following Human Performance class tools:

Critical Steps
Error Traps
Human Performance Tools for the Individual
After Action Review

The Critical Step Is..."The Critical Steps"
Many organizations are adding human performance artifacts to their pre-job briefs. Please do not understimate how important it is to lead that effort with critical step. It is often said that everyone in the company from the CEO to the last person hired must understand the concept of the critical steps and use that concept even when not at work, for example driving home and encountering a critical step as simple as driving through a busy intersection. Why? Because a clear discussion of the anticipation and flawless execution of critical steps of the job and tasks at hand makes the focus of the pre-job and pre-task brief much more proactive.

How can an organization expect a person to be able to understand what error traps to consider and what personal human performance tools to consider if they can not anticipate the critical step(s) in a given job and for the given tasks in a job. Errors made during the execution of irreversible critical steps are usually not forgiving. Several persons on the pre-job brief team worked as electricians and lineman and they have a saying that goes back generations: "There are bold electricians and lineman but there are no old, bold electricians and lineman" Miscues during critcal steps can result in near misses and even end with a catastrophic event. If there is ever a time to self check, peer check, stop and think or use your favorite human performance tool it is at each critical step. It is rare for a pre-job brief to have a human performance area and not ask the team or person to discuss and write down what they believe are the critical steps.

After the job and tasks are completed the team should be asking if there were any sigificant risks or issues that were previously unknown. This important to be able to use the pre-job brief as a manangement control to remove latent organizational hazards. But it is also important in the after action review to go through the critical steps again. Was each critical step corrrectly anticpated and planned for by the team and the person at the touch point of the critical step? Did they execute as expected without any unplanned release of energy or unplanned change of mass or unplanned release of data during the irreversible critical step? When first bringing the disicpline of the critical step into an organization, one of the best primers for organizations and individuals is from the man who wrote the book on the importance of critical steps, Tony Muschara:

Learn About Critical Steps
Ref: CRITICAL STEPS: HOW TO IDENTIFY AND MANAGE THE MOST IMPORTANT HUMAN PERFORMANCE RISKS IN OPERATIONS, Tony Muschara, CPT, Performance Improvement, vol. 53, no. 9, October 2014 ©2014 International Society for Performance Improvement, Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/pfi.21437

How to Use the Tools

Now that you understand the three different classes of tools it is easy to start using the tools to help you write a new pre-job brief or just update an existing one.

Ideally each class of tool should match a major area of your pre-job brief. You may want to consider having three major areas in your pre-job brief: OSHA, Good Practices and Human Performance.

Within a particular area you would then begin to add sections for different tools that you are going to use. For example, in your OSHA Requirements area you might want to have the following sections: Hazards, PPE, Work Procedures, Energized Source Control

Finally you might want to use one last grouping of sub sections for different parts of particular tool that you intend to use. For example, in your OSHA Requirements area, in the Hazards section you might want to have the following sub sections: Gravity, Electricity, Mechanical Energy (kinetic), Mechancial Energy (potential), Chemical, Environment, Weather and Ergonomic.

Once you have these final sub-sections setup it is just a matter of using the tools in the Pre-Job Brief Toolbox to pick and choose the items that you feel are appropriate for each sub section to meet the requirments of the pre-job brief that you are writing or updating. For example, as you browse the Electricity part of the Hazards tool you would pick and choose the appropriate electrical hazards that match the task you are writing the pre-job brief for.

You would then go on to browse the Personal Protective Equipment tool to choose the appropriate PPE to add to your PPE section. Since you now have all available Hazards as well as all avaibable PPE right in front of you it should be easier to you to write a more task specific and complete pre-job brief. You then repeat this process using the matching tool for all three sections of your pre-job brief: OSHA, Good Practices, Human Performance.

Use Case Scenarios

Use Case One:
Updating a Pre-Job Brief after a Near Miss or Event


Usually after a significant event one of the findings is that the pre-job or pre-task brief(s) could use some improvement. At an unnamed utility when ever they are going to review and improve a pre-job brief they use two fundamentals: 1) A process for revieing and improving the pre-job brief. 2) A new job hazard analyis is undertaken.

The process part is arduous because it in order to get this done different groups across the organization must all be a part and have their say. The groups have different backgrounds and experience levels with pre-job briefings. Some are concerned about the content of the pre-job brief. Other groups are concerned about what colors are used on the form. When the request is sent out to each group they are given the current pre-job brief along with the website link to the Pre-Job Brief Toolbox. The PJB Toolbox helps to "educate or refresh" all of the different groups quickly so they can all be informed of what other utilities across the united states are doing from a good practices perspective. This helps the whole process to move just a little bit more smoothly because the communitation between the groups is referenced PJB Toolbox's colletion of PJBs and good practices from across the industry.

Use Case Two:
Adding Human Performance to an Existing Pre-Job Brief


At another unamed Utility they have been using a Pre-Job Brief form for a long time and everyone agrees that it is really needs to be updated and made current. As part of the updating process the Compliance team wants to apply newly learned Human Performance knowledge into the Pre-Job Brief. The core of Human Performance reduces errors at the individual level while managing internal controls that identify and remove latent hazards that are inadvertantly created by an organization as part of its normal business model.

The Utility is using the PJB Toolbox to see how other utilites are using Human Performance as a part of the pre-job brief. Since the workforce in the Utility already uses the pre-job brief it is more natural to add human performance into the pre-job brief and teach the workforce human peformance in the context of giving more effective pre-job briefs that truely are desgined to elimate catastrophic events.

The Tools

Hazards

Class: OSHA

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 23

Hazards was used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Gravity 19 83% Group Gravity is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Working aloft or elevated 3 13% Checkbox
Working in manlift 1 4% Checkbox
Falling from a ladder 4 17% Checkbox
Falling from a scaffold 1 4% Checkbox
Falling from bucket 1 4% Checkbox
Working in manlift 1 4% Checkbox
Falling from a height 9 39% Yes/No(4)
Checkbox(5)
Falling objects 4 17% Checkbox
Falling structures 3 13% Checkbox
Aerial device operation 4 17% Checkbox
Climbing obstructions 3 13% Checkbox Obstructions that could cause fall while climbing.
Falling into open trenches or holes 5 22% Checkbox
Ladder placement can not be secured 1 4% Fill in the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Other 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Electricity 18 78% Group Electricity is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Energized? 6 26% Yes/No(2)
Checkbox(4)
Adjacent energized equipment 3 13% Yes/No w/FITB(1)
Checkbox(2)
Equipment meaning: Insulated or bare conductors, terminals, buss, breakers or any “Adjacent” energized equipment that poses a risk while performing the task.
Bare conductors 4 17% Yes/No w/FITB(2)
Checkbox(2)
Deteriorated insulation 1 4% Yes/No w/FITB(1)
Minimum Approach Distance (MAD) is not physically possible 2 9% Checkbox
Electrical contact 5 22% Checkbox
Induced voltage 4 17% Checkbox
Backfeed 8 35% Yes/No w/FITB(2)
Checkbox(6)
Open CT 1 4% Fill In the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Test leads 1 4% Fill In the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Arc Flash Potential 6 26% Checkbox
Grounding 2 9% Checkbox Improper grounding is the hazard
Grounding: Step Potential 3 13% Checkbox The step voltage between the feet of a person standing near an energized grounded objectA person could be at risk of injury during a fault simply by standing near the grounding point.
Grounding: Touch Potential 2 9% Checkbox The touch voltage between the energized object and the feet of a person in contact with the object.
Grounding of Vehicle 4 17% Yes/No w/FITB(3)
Checkbox(1)
Transmission Ground: Bonding down guys 1 4% Checkbox
Transmission Ground: Overhead static to pole bond 1 4% Checkbox
Transmission Ground:Pole bond to ground rod 1 4% Checkbox
Substation Ground: Bonding OH static to station grid 1 4% Checkbox
Substation Ground: Cadwelding to main grid 1 4% Checkbox
Substation Ground: Multiple case grounds 1 4% Checkbox
Static charge 2 9% Checkbox
Circulating current? 1 4% Checkbox
High available fault current 1 4% Yes/No w/FITB
Switching required 1 4% Checkbox
Other 7 30% Fill In the Blank
Mechanical Kinetic Energy 12 52% Group Something that is moving is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Backing up a vehicle 1 4% Checkbox
Moving or operating equipment 4 17% Checkbox
Moving and shifting loads 3 13% Checkbox
Recoil 1 4% Checkbox
Moving parts 2 9% Checkbox
Rotating machinery 3 13% Checkbox
Pinch points 8 35% Yes/No w/FITB(5)
Checkbox(3)
Grounding of Vehicle 4 17% Yes/No w/FITB(3)
Checkbox(1)
Machine guard bypassed or removed 1 4% Checkbox
Heavy equipment operation 3 13% Checkbox
Unexpected equipment failure 2 9% Checkbox
Needs to cut anything 1 4% Checkbox
Destructive removal 1 4% Checkbox e.g. Cutting torch, grinding paint
Welding 1 4% Checkbox
Hydraulic tool use 1 4% Checkbox
Rolling rotor 1 4% Checkbox
Towing or hitching 1 4% Checkbox
Other 4 17% Fill in the Blank
Mechanical Potential Energy 15 65% Group Accidental release of potential (stored) energy is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Hoisting and rigging loads 13 57% Yes/No(5)
Checkbox(8)
Critical lift that exceeds 75% of maximum capacity 6 26% Yes/No w/FITB(4)
Checkbox(6)
Grounding of Vehicle 4 17% Yes/No w/FITB(3)
Checkbox(1)
Overloading capacity 1 4% Checkbox
Vehicle stability 3 13% Checkbox
Vehicle chocks 1 4% Checkbox
Conductor and/or Cable Tension 1 4% Checkbox
Loaded springs 2 9% Checkbox
Breaker mechanism 2 9% Checkbox
Compressed air or other gas 3 13% Checkbox
Pressurized (incompressible) fluids 3 13% Checkbox
Tree limbs that are ready to fall 1 4% Checkbox Dangerous trees ready to drop tree limb on you. Dead limbs usually come down in wind and rain.
Unexpected equipment failure 2 9% Checkbox
Grounding of Vehicle 1 4% Checkbox
Underbuilt 1 4% Checkbox
Other 4 17% Fill in the Blank
Chemical 12 52% Group Chemicals are the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Potential contact with chemicals 5 22% Checkbox
Potential contact with asbestos 7 30% Checkbox
Potential contact with lead 5 22% Checkbox
Potential contact with acids 2 9% Checkbox
Potential contact with PCBs 5 22% Checkbox
Fumes 1 4% Checkbox
Dust 3 13% Checkbox
Hazardous waste 1 4% Checkbox
Other 3 13% Fill in the Blank
Environmental 17 74% Group The working environment is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Traffic 10 43% Yes/No w/FITB(1)
Checkbox(9)
Traffic: Heavy | Light | None 2 9% Checkbox
New traffic patterns/td> 1 4% Checkbox
Driving conditions 4 17% Checkbox
Site or Substation speed limits 1 4% Checkbox Driving speed in excess of 5 MPH on the site or substation is a hazard
Unsecure load(s) 2 9% Checkbox
Confined space 11 48% Yes/No(3)
Checkbox(8)
Difficult access 1 4% Checkbox
Close clearance or congestion 1 4% Checkbox
Excavations 3 13% Checkbox
Buried hazard underground 3 13% Checkbox Electrical line, gas line, welcome line, other line
Potential to be burned by hot surface 3 13% Checkbox
Ventilation 1 4% Checkbox
Carbon monoxide 1 4% Checkbox
Condition of equipment 1 4% Fill in the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Condition of pole or tower 1 4% Fill in the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Condition of insulators 1 4% Fill in the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Identical adjacent equipment 1 4% Fill in the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Sharp edges on materials or equipment 3 13% Fill in the Blank Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Cluttered walkways and/or stairways 4 17% Fill in the Blank(1)
Checkbox(3)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Deteriorated facility 3 13% Yes/No w/FITB
Power outage (fire protection, lighting, exit) 1 4% Checkbox
Working on equipment with a fuel line 1 4% Checkbox
Insects 4 17% Fill in the Blank(1)
Checkbox(3)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Wildlife and/or Vermin 4 17% Yes/No(3)
Checkbox(1)
Terrain is Uneven 9 39% Yes/No(4)
Checkbox(5)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Terrain is Slippery 4 17% Fill in the Blank(1)
Checkbox(3)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Excavated, uncovered soil 1 4% Checkbox
Lighting 7 30% Yes/No(4)
Fill in the Blank(1)
Checkbox(2)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Noise 4 17% Fill in the Blank(1)
Checkbox(3)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Oxygen deficiency 1 4% Checkbox
Insulation debris 1 4% Checkbox
Radio frequency (RF) exposure 1 4% Checkbox
External factors 1 4% Checkbox
General public safety 1 4% Checkbox
Pedestrian hazards 2 9% Checkbox
Working above public persons 1 4% Checkbox
Water hazard 1 4% Checkbox
Waste hazard - Air, Storm Water 1 4% Checkbox
Grounding of Vehicle 1 4% Checkbox
Danger zone 1 4% Checkbox Physical areas in the general work area where that could cause incident.
Other 5 22% Fill in the Blank
Weather 14 61% Group Weather is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Weather 9 39% Yes/No(2)
Checkbox(7)
Potential to succumb to heat stroke 1 4% Checkbox
Potential to succumb ot hypothermia 1 4% Checkbox
Extreme heat 4 17% Checkbox
Extreme cold 4 17% Checkbox
Extreme temperatures 2 9% Checkbox
High wind conditions 1 4% Checkbox
Sun exposure (is shade available) 3 9% Fill in the Blank(2)
Checkbox(1)
Describe Action Taken (Risk:Action)
Dehydration 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Snowpack or ice hazards 1 4% Checkbox
Other 4 17% Fill in the Blank
Ergonomic 13 57% Group Overloading or fatiguing your body is the hazard.
Name Usage % Type Description
Strain hazard 2 8% Checkbox
Sprain hazard 2 8% Checkbox
Body positioning and form before exerting force. Form first principles 8 35% Checkbox
Body can not be positioned away from line of fire 3 13% Checkbox
Hand placement hazards 1 4% Checkbox
Maintain a position of strength 2 9% Checkbox
Rely on the tool strength not body strength 1 4% Checkbox
Manual lifting, pulling or pushing over 50 pounds 2 9% Checkbox
Excessive reaching, bending or twisting 1 4% Checkbox
Repetitive motion or vibration 1 4% Checkbox
Slip hazard 8 35% Yes/No(4)
Checkbox(4)
Trip hazard 9 39% Yes/No(4)
Checkbox(5)
Exhale upon exertion 1 4% Checkbox
Use the best available tool 1 4% Checkbox
The right equipment for the task is not available or can not be used 1 4% Checkbox
Keep tool batteries charged 1 4% Checkbox
Recommend improvements or suggestions a noticed 1 4% Checkbox
If an evolution becomes strenuous or repetitive, consider sharing the workload as appropriate 1 4% Checkbox
Weight, length 1 4% Checkbox
Knee protection 1 4% Checkbox
Other 2 9% Fill in the Blank
Troubleshooting 1 4% Checkbox
Coordination and communication with others 1 4% Checkbox
Review existing Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) 3 13% Checkbox
Historical Incidents associated with the task 2 9% Checkbox
Equipment requires inspection every time before using 8 35% Yes/No(4)
Checkbox(4)
Rubber gloves, vehicles carrying or towing loads
Operating permit is or inspection date is expired 3 13% Checkbox Crane permits, forklift permits, hotstick permits
Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health? (IDLH) 1 4% Fill in the Blank What are the hazards that are Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) that were discussed?
Controls to Mitigate IDLH Hazards? 1 4% Fill in the Blank What are the controls to mitigate the Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health hazards?
Describe Major Hazards 1 4% Fill in the Blank Describe Major Hazards (column 1), List
List any general job site hazards: 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Can you remove hazards from the area? How? 1 4% Yes/No
Can the hazards be engineered out? How? 1 4% Yes/No
Equipment access: List any obstructions and hazards 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Work planned: Energized, De-energized 1 4% Choose One of the Two
Control Testing: Yes, No 1 4% Yes/No
Devices in Local: Yes, No 1 4% Yes/No
Test Panel Used: Yes, No 1 4% Yes/No
Risk mitigation strategy 1 4% Fill in the Blank What is the risk level of the identified hazard? Low-Medium-High,
What is the risk mitigation strategy?
What is the risk level after mitigation? Low-Medium-High
Task Specific Hazards 1 4% Fill in the Blank Task, Potential Hazards, Hazard Control Measures, Task Changes, New Potential Hazards, New Hazard Control Measures
Have all potential hazards and risks been mitigated? 1 4% Checkbox
Keep Test Leads OFF of Test Plug during Removal and Insertion 1 4% Warning
Manipulating Test Plug CT/PT Hazard wear Low Voltage Gloves 1 4% Warning
Other 5 22% Fill in the Blank

Personal Protective Equipment

Class: OSHA

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 24

Personal Protective Equipment was used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Hearing Protection 12 50% Group Personal protective equipment for the ears.
Name Usage % Type Description
Hearing protection 9 38% Checkbox
Do you need double hearing protection? 1 4% Checkbox
Ear protection 2 8% Fill in the Blank
Head Protection 11 46% Group Personal protective equipment for the head.
Name Usage % Type Description
Head protection 1 4% Checkbox
Hard Hat 10 42% Checkbox
Eye Protection 16 67% Group Personal protective equipment for the eyes.
Name Usage % Type Description
Safety Glasses 7 29% Checkbox
Face Shield 4 17% Checkbox
Eye PPE 1 4% Checkbox
Eye protection 1 4% Checkbox
Goggles 3 13% Checkbox
Face protection 1 4% Checkbox
Arc flash face shield w/ chin cup 1 4% Checkbox
What type of face/eye protection? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Hand Protection 16 67% Group Personal protective equipment for the hands.
Name Usage % Type Description
Hand PPE 1 4% Checkbox
Hand protection 1 4% Checkbox
Rubber gloves / sleeves 5 21% Checkbox
Eye protection 1 4% Checkbox
Glove type(s): Leather, Kevlar, Chemical, Welding, Dielectric, Thermal, Other 1 4% Checkbox
Face protection 1 4% Checkbox
Gloves 4 17% Checkbox
What type of hand protection?? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Air test gloves 1 4% Checkbox
Inspect gloves & blankets? 1 4% Checkbox
Foot protection 9 38% Group Personal protective equipment for the feet.
Name Usage % Type Description
Foot protection 3 13% Checkbox
Steel toe boots 1 4% Checkbox
Footwear 1 4% Checkbox
EH Footwear 4 17% Checkbox
FR Clothing 11 48% Group Flame Retardant (FR) Clothing Requirements
Name Usage % Type Description
FR Clothing 5 21% Checkbox
Is FR Clothing Required? 1 4% Yes/No
Fire retardant clothing 1 4% Checkbox
Coveralls 1 4% Checkbox
Flame resistant uniform 1 4% Checkbox
FR Garments 1 4% Checkbox
Long sleeve shirt 1 4% Checkbox
FR Clothing inspection 1 4% Checkbox
Fall protection 14 58% Group Personal protective equipment for falls.
Name Usage % Type Description
Fall protection > 6ft 1 4% Checkbox
Fall protection 11 46% Checkbox
Full body hardness & Lanyard 2 8% Checkbox
Climbing gear 1 4% Checkbox
Approved fall protection equipment/Rescue plan 1 4% Checkbox
Ladder safety 1 4% Checkbox
PPE 7 29% Fill in the Blank "PPE (FR clothing, hearing, footwear, eyewear, hard hats, safety vests, & other PPE)"
"PPE Review: FR clothing, hard hats, footwear, glasses & other PPE"
"Head, Face, Eyes, Ears, Hands, Feet"
"PPE/FR Requirements"
"Hard hat, Eye protection/Face Shield, Footwear, FR Clothing (substation), Hand Protection, Hearing Protection, Respirator, Inspection of PPE, Traffic Vests, Hood, etc." (Check if discussed)
Defenses(for Risks/Error-likely situations) 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Detailed hazard assessment - specific details of safety work plan and hazard mitigation 2 8% Fill in the Blank
List any special protective measures and PPE to be used 1 4% Fill in the Blank
What PPE is required for this job? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Risk mitigation strategy 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Specialty PPE 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Special Tools/PPE 1 4% Checkbox
Insulated tools 1 4% Checkbox
Molten Metal PPE 1 4% Checkbox
Electrical PPE 1 4% Checkbox

Work Procedures

Class: OSHA

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 24

Work Procedures was used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Isolation of Equipment 2 8% Checkbox
Check for Potential 2 8% Checkbox
Proper Grounding 4 17% Checkbox
Vehicle Grounds 4 17% Checkbox
E-911 Protocol 6 25% Checkbox
Vehicle Operations 1 4% Checkbox
Overhead Cranes 1 4% Checkbox
Tool Usage 1 4% Checkbox
Dig Safe 1 4% Checkbox
Working Clearances 3 13% Checkbox Minimum Working Distance?
Proper documentation prior to starting job? 1 4% Checkbox
Trenching/Excavation 1 4% Checkbox
Aerial Lifts 1 4% Checkbox
Line Clearances 1 4% Checkbox
Meter Testing/Installation 1 4% Checkbox
Crane 1 4% Checkbox
Rigging 1 4% Checkbox
Review procedures, bulletins, etc. 1 4% Checkbox
Is there is a written procedure for this task? 3 13% Yes/No "Yes" - Go get it"
"No" - Proceed
List Procedure Name/Number

Control Of Energy Source

Class: OSHA

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 26

Control of Energy Source was used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Minimum Approach Distance ? ?% Group ?
Name Usage % Type Description
Determine 4 15% Checkbox OSHA
Charts 2 8% Fill in the Blank
Document 4 15% Fill in the Blank
Clearance 1 4% Group ?
Name Usage % Type Description
Hold 3 12% Checkbox
Assurance 2 8% Checkbox
Clearance Points 7 27% Checkbox
Open Points 5 19% Fill in the Blank Visual
Isolate Test 3 12% Checkbox
LOTO 6 23% Checkbox Lock Out, Tag Out (LOTO)
Foreign Circuit 6 23% Fill in the Blank
Switching 6 23% Group ?
Name Usage % Type Description
Substations 4 15% Fill in the Blank
Circuit # 5 19% Fill in the Blank
Switch # 5 19% Fill in the Blank
Recloser # 2 8% Fill in the Blank
Voltage 3 12% Fill in the Blank
De-energized ? 5 19% Fill in the Blank
Iosalte Devices 2 8% Checkbox
Switching Order # 3 12% Fill in the Blank
Other 0 0% Fill in the Blank
Grounding ? ?% Group ?
Name Usage % Type Description
Identify Isolate Test & Ground 1 4% Checkbox
Induced Energy 7 27% Checkbox
Grounds 7 27% Checkbox
Ground Manual 1 4% Checkbox
Ground Method 1 4% Checkbox
Vehicles Grounded? 6 23% Checkbox
Locations 3 12% Fill in the Blank
Substation ? ?% Group ?
Name Usage % Type Description
Grounds bus tie 1 3% Checkbox
Batteries 2 8% Checkbox
Electrical - High Voltage 11 2% Fill in the Blank(?)
Checkbox(?)
T&D Hazard Assessment check list
Switching 10 38% Checkbox
Grounding 10 38% Fill in the Blank(?)
Checkbox(?)
Clearance - LOTO 17 65% Fill in the Blank
Stored Energy 2 8% Checkbox Determine
Backfeed 8 31% Checkbox
Induction 7 27% Checkbox

Emergency Preparedness

Class: Good Practice

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 25

Emergency Preparedness was used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Ambulance stop/ eyewash location 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency response? 1 4% Checkbox Under procedures and permits
Escape plan 1 4% Checkbox Under job planning
Rescue plan 1 4% Checkbox Under job planning
Emergency communication 1 4% Checkbox Under pre-job assessment
Emergency evacuation 1 4% Checkbox Under job planning
Emergency Phone Number 2 8% Fill in the Blank Next to "Location (Address or GPS Coordinates)"
Next to "Address/County, Physical location, Lat/Long"
Action in case of emergency 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Approved fall protection equipment / rescue plan 1 4% Checkbox Under pre-job assessment
Emergency Information: Work address / city/state 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency Information: Nearest Intersection 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action Plan: Location of work 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action Plan: City/County of Work 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action plan: Major cross streets 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action plan: GPS Coordinates 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action plan: Safety Contact name & phone number 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action plan: Closest medical center, address, phone number 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action plan: AED location(s) 1 4% Fill in the Blank
BES Dispatcher Switching Emergency Number 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Verify working phone and review emergency phone/radio procedure 1 4% Checkbox
Location of first aid items 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Did you check in with BES dispatcher / Distribution Control Center / Plant control room? 1 4% Checkbox Procedure?
Tom Neary is compiling the data for this tool...
Ward Andrews is compiling the data for this tool...

Critical Steps

Class: Human Performance

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 27

The Critical Steps were used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
List the Critcal Steps 4 15% Group Step / What could go wrong? / Countermeasures; What is the worst thing that could happen?; What are the conditions that would STOP this job?
Name Usage % Type Description
Step / What could go wrong? / Countermeasures 4 15% Fill in the Blank
What is the worst thing that could happen? 3 11% Fill in the Blank
What are the conditions that would STOP this job? 2 7% Fill in the Blank
How could tooling fail? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Imagine you just got hurt or damaged a component: how did it happen? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
List defenses and how they will be used. 2 7% Fill in the Blank
Include tools, practices, barriers, etc. 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Each identified hazard and error-likely situation MUST have an identified defense. 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Key Questions 2 7% Fill in the Blank
Critical Step Identification 1 4% Group
Name Usage % Type Description
Evaluate Test Data/Results 1 4% Checkbox
Isolate Devices/Equipment 1 4% Checkbox
Lift and/or Land Wires 1 4% Checkbox
Load/Flash Current Circuits 1 4% Checkbox
Provide Temporary Power Source 1 4% Checkbox
Pull Blades 1 4% Checkbox
Remotely Access Equipment 1 4% Checkbox
Work Near Sensitive Equipment 1 4% Checkbox
Determine if Stored Energy is Present 1 4% Checkbox
Other? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Lisa Umeda is compiling the data for this tool...

Human Performance Tools for Individuals

Class: class: Human Performance

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 26

Human Performance Tools for Individuals were used in ?? Pre-Job Briefs (??%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Stop, Think, Act, Review, (STAR) 8 31% Checkbox "Self Check" "Stop-Think-Act-Review: Used when if attention is not on task, error is likely"
Stop when unsure 5 19% Checkbox
Stop & Seek Out Help If Unsure 2 8% Checkbox
If the scope of the work changes, STOP WORK and initiate another Job Briefing 1 4% Checkbox
Verbalize, Point & Touch / Touch Or Point 2 8% Checkbox
Revisit Take 5 After Breaks! 1 4% Checkbox
After interruption, confirm Take 5 is reviewed again 1 4% Checkbox
3 Way communication 3 12% Checkbox
Work Worker Workplace 1 4% Checkbox
Questioning Attitude 5 19% Checkbox
Task preview 3 12% Checkbox
Pre-job brief 2 8% Checkbox
Job site Review 3 12% Checkbox
Peer check 5 19% Checkbox
Peer coaching 3 12% Checkbox
Independent verification 4 15% Checkbox
Rapid Risk Assessment 1 4% Checkbox
Emergency action plan: Safety Contact name & phone number 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Escalate to Supervisor 1 4% Checkbox
Procedural Adherence/Use 4 15% Checkbox
BES Dispatcher Switching Emergency Number 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Place Keeping/Flagging 6 23% Checkbox
Work Package Place-Keeping 1 4% Checkbox
Turnover 3 12% Checkbox
Situational Awareness 1 4% Checkbox
Tactical Work Zone 1 4% Checkbox
Coaching 1 4% Checkbox
Checklist 1 4% Checkbox
Turnover 3 12% Checkbox
Human Performance: What mode are you in?
- Skill Based
- Rule
- Knowledge Based
1 4% Checkbox
Two Minute Drill/Rule 2 8% Checkbox "Taking TWO minutes before a critical step to review your plan and steps
Use Three Way Communications when giving information or instructions to a person in the field 1 4% Checkbox Reminder at the top of the sheet
All Stop 1 4% Checkbox
Speaking Up 3 12% Checkbox Ensuring you have all needed information for a task OR asking a question when something does not feel right
What Human Performance Tools did you use today? Doing what task? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Three Way Communications will be used for: Information that directs the operation of the gas and electric system Information that relays critical data or parameters Performing an established procedure Task assignments or actionable instructions 1 4% Checkbox
Phonetic alphabet 1 4% Checkbox NATO phonetic alphabet and Example: "Breaker B-21, Bravo 21" or "33624A/33624B Load Interrupter Switch, 33624 Alpha and 33624 Bravo Switch
All Stop 1 4% Checkbox
Did I miss anything? 1 4% Checkbox
It is recommended that the below tasks have a pre-task peer check by a supervisor not on the task 1 4% Checkbox Listing of Tasks: Destructive removal i.e. arc gouging, washing out w/torch etc, Heating bolts,Critical lift (>75% capacity),AC Voltages above 1110V, DC above 50V, Removing bolts using hydraulic wrenches, Working in confined spaces, Any LOTO Concerns, Working at elevation with fall protection, Rolling rotor, Grinding pain or stainless steel, Lightning (30/30 Rule, ref FP0102), At request of safety person, First time Doing Task on this Frame/Site, First time you are doing this task, Seldom performed task, First time evolution task i.e. working with R&D on new tool.
Other tasks where a pre-task peer check by somone not on the task may be helpful 1 4% Checkbox Environmental Risks, Hot Work, Tasks without procedure, Chemical use, Fire potential/Welding, Extreme High/Low Tempreature, Material handling in confined area, Time pressure/End of shift, Hydraulic tool use, Insulation Debris, High noise, Manual lifting over 50 lbs, Pinch points, FME Area, High Wind, Falling Object Potential, Fatigue/stress, Repetitive but critical task

After Action Review

Class: Human Performance

Pre-Job Briefs Analyzed to Compile this Tool: 27

The After Action Review was used in 16 Pre-Job Briefs (59%)

Name Usage % Type Description
Post-Job Review – Please Communicate Lessons Learned 3 11% Checkbox
What could we have done better? 2 7% Checkbox When work is complete, perform a verbal debrief with the crew(s).s
List problems with this assignment 1 4% Fill in the Blank
What can we improve on? 2 7% Fill in the Blank
How could we improve safety, quality and efficiency? 1 4% Fill in the Blank If there is an idea to improve tooling or efficiency inmate a suggestion. Fixable forms are in….
What did we do well? 2 7% Fill in the Blank
Did we learn anything new? 2 7% Checkbox When work is complete, perform a verbal debrief with the crew(s).
What new risks or error likely situations came up? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Further actions required for hazards found? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Emergency Information: Work address / city/state 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Debriefing 2 7% Fill in the Blank
Emergency action Plan: Location of work 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Did any near misses occur during the activities? 1 4% Yes/No
Emergency action plan: Major cross streets 1 4% Yes/No
Did all equipment and tooling perform correctly? 1 4% Yes/No
Are any changes to procedures or work methods needed? 1 4% Yes/No
What Human Performance Tools you use today? Doing what task? 1 4% Fill in the Blank 1) _________________________________When? ________________
2) _________________________________When? ________________
Emergency action plan: AED location(s) 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Items needing client attention? by Who? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Items needing sub’s attention? by Who? 1 4% Fill in the Blank
Job site clean up completed before leaving? 6 22% Yes/No (5)
Checkbox (1)
Job site secure and vehicle walk around completed? 5 19% Yes/No
Material properly unloaded using appropriate PPE? 4 15% Yes/No
Turnover required to next shift? 1 4% Checkbox
Task completed successfully 1 4% Checkbox
Did the Pre Task Brief or performance of the task reveal a previously unknown or unrecognized significant risk or other signifiant issue? 1 4% Yes/No If Yes: Conduct a detailed Post Task Review The Detailed Post Task Review should follow a more formal “After Action Review” format: What went well? What did not go as well? What are the lessons we need to learn? What are the follow-up actions and who will do them?
Does a procedure / JSA need to be written or revised? 1 4% Yes/No If Yes: Conduct a detailed Post Task Review The Detailed Post Task Review should follow a more formal “After Action Review” format: What went well? What did not go as well? What are the lessons we need to learn? What are the follow-up actions and who will do them?
Are there any lessons learned that the next people performing the task need to know? 1 4% Yes/No If Yes: Conduct a detailed Post Task Review The Detailed Post Task Review should follow a more formal “After Action Review” format: What went well? What did not go as well? What are the lessons we need to learn? What are the follow-up actions and who will do them?
Did everything go safely as planned? 1 4% Yes/No
Does this job need a detailed post job review? 1 4% Yes/No
Other 1 4% Fill in the Blank

Meet The Team

The Pre-Job Brief Toolbox team is made up of a group of volunteers who do the work (Analysts) and a few really great Advisors.

Analysts

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Lisa Umeda

City of Vernon

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Ward Andrews

Wilson Construction

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Norman Szczepanski

Sacramento Utility District (SMUD)

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Tom Neary

OpCon Technologies

Advisors

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Ron Fenex

Central Arizona Project (CAP)

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Kevin Harris

Eversource Energy

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Wally Groff

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

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Terry Morford

Morford Energy Consulting